Tag Archives: pet safety

The Doggy Handbook: The Bare Necessities

In your home, there are a few basic things that you are going to need for your dog. Without these items, you won’t have the right tools to not only care for your pooch, but also to train them. At Philomena London, we strive to provide as many products as possible to make your dog feel right at home. In the Doggy Handbook series, we will be looking at some fantastic training tips, the essential products, and also some great guides on activities and days out that are completely dog friendly. This first chapter will take a look at some of the basic items you need for your dog.

 

Food and Water

Of course, every dog needs food and water – but they also need a bowl for each as well. There are so many different bowls to choose from, as well as a wide price range so you don’t need to feel pressured into spending a fortune. We have bowls ranging from £4 to £60, so make sure to check out the section on our website here.

We also have a great range of food and treats from the Natural Dog Food Company, which is made from completely natural ingredients for a better and healthier food. Plus, dogs absolutely love it. Make sure you stock up on the treats – they will be essential for training!

 

Sleep

Every dog needs a comfy bed to sleep on. After all, chasing rabbits all afternoon and playing with friends can be exhausting work. So when the day comes to an end and it’s time to settle down, dogs want somewhere soft and warm to curl up for the night. We have a fantastic range of dog beds available from Charley Chau and John Whitaker, so that your canine companions can have sweet dreams and a comfy rest. Check out our selection here.

 

Walk

The dog walk is the part of the day every pooch looks forward to the most. When out on the field or in the dog park, they want to look their best, and what better way to express that than with a fantastic new collar and lead? We have an absolutely amazing range of collars and leads available from a range of designers – including us!

If you are looking for something low cost but with amazing designs, then Sweetpea and Boo are the ones you should look at. On the other end of the spectrum, you can take a look at our own line of collars with Charlotte Dujardin that are made from soft English leather. Plus, we have everything in between, with brands like Pioneros and Simba Jones. Take a look at our entire range here.

 

Play

Toys are so important to dogs, both as a form of entertainment but also distraction. We have a great range of Beco toys available, which are made from all natural material and also incredibly durable. The plush toys are double stitched and we have a great character selection, as well as three sizes so that every dog can have one. The rubber bones and balls are really tough, perfect for dogs who like to have a good chew. Plus, the fact that they are all natural means that if they tear a chunk off of one of the bones there is a lot less panic is it ends up being swallowed.

 

Poop

Every dog needs to poop on a walk, and often people are reluctant to clean it up because of the impact on the environment that plastic bags have. Well, we have the answer to your concerns in the form of the Beco eco-friendly poop bags.

It only takes a matter of weeks for these to start decomposing and they are 100% biodegradable, so there are no negative effects on the environment. Plus, they come in two sizes – so the bigger dogs are accommodated for. At an affordable price and with the option to buy an eco-friendly poop bag holder, these are a great buy and essential for any dog walk. Take a look here.

 

To Conclude

At Philomena London, we aim to provide everything we can for your canine companion. We know they are important to you, and so we always ensure that our products are the best possible quality. Hopefully this guide has given you some insight into the basic items you need for your dog, especially if you are about to rescue one or buy a puppy. With so much to offer, we’d love for you to visit our website and check out some of our great doggy products.

About Alabama Rot

I’m sure many of you have heard of Alabama Rot and it’s occurrence in the UK over recent years. While the number of cases have remained small, it is still a disease worth looking out for. Alabama Rot often leads to fatalities in dogs, so please take a moment to read this post which explains the disease and also gives advice on how to try and prevent it.

 

What is Alabama Rot?

Alabama Rot was first discovered in the USA in 1980, and primarily affected Greyhounds. However, especially after its arrival in the UK, it has been discovered that the disease can affect any and all breeds of dog, and so far the disease has been found to only exist in dogs with no other animals contracting it thus far (including humans). While the number of the cases in the UK are quite low (around 60 cases between 2012 and 2015) the fatality rate is 9/10 and so is not something to be taken lightly. While the last thing anyone should do is panic, it is important to be aware of the seriousness of the condition so that any suspicions that your dog may have contracted it are reported immediately. Currently, the cause of Alabama rot is unknown.

 

What are the signs of Alabama Rot?

There are several symptoms of the disease that present themselves in dogs. While some of these symptoms may also be related to different conditions it is advised that you stay on the safe side and get your dogs checked out at the vet.

  • Skin lesions (usually on lower leg and elbows. Also on the tongue and mouth)
  • The hair around lesions will fall off, potentially causing the dog to lick excessively
  • Kidney failure (vomiting, fatigue, lack of appetite)
  • Ulcers and sores

The average time between skin lesions and kidney failure is around three days so it is imperative you get your dog to the vet in this window. While it can be difficult to distinguish lesions from cuts and other wounds, it is advised that you take action even if you are only a little concerned. As the disease is rare, most vets will not know how to treat this illness and so it is worth either calling or getting referred to the Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists. They have extensive knowledge of the disease and have dealt with the majority of cases. They are also an amazing practice, our experience with them when Inky was sick (with an unrelated illness) was amazing.

 

How can you protect your pet?

While there is no vaccine for Alabama Rot and no known means of cause or prevention, there are a few things you can try and do to help to protect your dog from the disease. The main thing you can do as an owner is keep a close eye on your dog while walking to monitor anything they may pick up, chew, or eat on their walks. If they become ill, call a vet as soon as possible and provide clear and accurate details of the illness.

It is advised that you try to avoid walking your dog in forested areas if possible, as this is where the disease is often contracted, however there is no certain evidence that the disease is based on environmental factors. So far, cases have occurred as far apart as Cornwall and Yorkshire with a spike of cases appearing in the New Forest in 2013. Recently, Gloucestershire was also affected along with Northern Ireland.

The disease is currently thought to be picked up on muddy paws and legs so it is strongly advised that you give your dog a thorough wash after a mucky walk. This may help prevention of the disease.

While the disease can be contracted all year round, the vast majority of cases occurred between November and May. This suggests a possible association with winter and spring, but unfortunately we still have no certain evidence.

 

How can you keep updated?

The Alabama Rot website is excellent for updates on recent occurrences of the disease and also for giving advice on what to do if you are afraid your dog has contracted it. We highly recommend that you follow them and their reports so that you can stay updated on news about Alabama Rot in your area and any signs that a cause or vaccine may have been discovered.

Please also be sure to keep Anderson Moores Veterinary Surgery’s details to hand in case you should encounter the condition, as they are specialists and know how to best treat the condition.

There are many dogs who have survived Alabama Rot, if you are even a little afraid that your dog may be sick with it then please do not hesitate to get veterinary advice. Please note that we at Philomena London are not veterinary professionals, and while we do our best to gather reliable sources information may not always be 100% accurate.

A Happy New Year for Your Pet

Hopefully you all had a wonderful Christmas, and your pets were spoiled rotten (just like ours). After the joy and warmth of Christmas Day, the preparations for New Year’s celebrations begin, and I’d like to take the time to talk to you about the ways in which your pet can stay safe during the celebrations. Below are things you can do to reduce stress and keep them happy while you party.

The main thing that causes pets stress during New Year’s celebrations are the fireworks. They can cause incredibly high levels of anxiety and so it is important to take some precautions before the evening celebrations begin.

  1. Exercise

Take your dog for a long run or walk before the evening festivities. Play fetch or have them run around to really work off that energy. Our dogs respond really well to flyers so it’s worth giving them a go. The more tired they are from the walk, the more likely they are to sleep through the noise from the fireworks.  When it comes to your cats you can try playing games with them with a cat wand or a laser pen – most cats love the laser pen game. They will be tired out in no time.

2. Keep them indoors

Keep your cats and dogs indoors during fireworks. If they are outside and unattended during the celebrations there is a chance that they will escape through fear and stress. When it comes to cats it’s best to keep them inside as the noise can lead them to running away and hiding, many cats go missing every year as a result of them getting lost and disorientated during fireworks.

3. Keep them confined

If you are having the party at your house then be sure to keep your cat or dog confined to a safe room in the house where guests are unlikely to accidentally let them out. By giving them a room to be confined in you are reducing the chances of escape through fear but also decreasing stress levels. So many dogs go missing every year after they run away through fear.

4. Feliway and Adaptil

Feliway and Adaptil are pheromone diffusers, for cats and dogs respectively. The release of pheromones helps to calm and de-stress pets and are often used during fireworks. Generally, Feliway and Adaptil are incredibly effective and really help when it comes to keeping your pet calm, all you have to do it plug it into the wall. If your pets gets very anxious during fireworks it is definitely best to give this a try.

Image from Google

As a final note, it is important to remember to watch what your pet is eating. No doubt there will be a delicious array of snacks for you and your guests to eat throughout the night, so be sure to watch your cats and dogs to make sure they aren’t eating anything that is potentially dangerous to them such as nuts, raisins, and chocolate. No one wants to rush to the vet on New Year’s Eve.

We hope you have a safe and happy New Year’s celebration tomorrow night. We at Philomena London wish you all the best for 2016 and thank you all for your support over the past year and look forward to seeing you again in the new one!

6 Ways to Keep Your Pet Safe This Christmas

Christmas is the most exciting time of year. It is a time when we come together to exchange gifts and spend time with the ones we love most – and that includes our pets. However, as with every holiday, we have to remember how to keep them safe as there are so many things that can cause them harm during the festive season.

  1. Deck the Halls

When decorating be careful using glass ornaments for your tree and the house as these are a choking hazard for dogs – especially the round ones as they can be mistaken for balls! If you do have any decorations like this then keep them up in the higher branches of the tree so that your dog can’t reach. If you are using candles please ensure these are also up high to prevent your dog knocking them off the tree and onto themselves.

Tinsel, garlands, and electrical wires also prove to be a risk for dogs. While the tinsel and garlands prove a choking hazard (or risk of poisoning in the case of garlands) the electrical wires could end up giving your pet a nasty shock if they manage to nibble through it!

Image from Google
Image from Google

2. With boughs of Holly

Holly, poinsettia’s, and mistletoe are highly toxic to pets. Be sure to keep these out of reach of your furry friends to avoid an emergency visit to the vets at Christmas time! If, however, you think your dog may have ingested any of these items then look out for these two main symptoms before rushing them to the vet – vomiting and difficulty breathing.

3. O Christmas Tree

There is nothing more wonderful than the sight of a beautifully decorated live Christmas tree. It is something to be enjoyed by the whole family. Please do be aware, however, that when purchasing your live tree you should be careful as some trees carry mould that can cause horrible allergic reactions in cats and dogs. The main symptom of this is repository problems, so do keep an eye on your animal companion.

Some dogs will also take to drinking from the base of your live Christmas tree. The water found in these base pots can make them incredibly sick so do try and keep it covered where possible to prevent mischievous noses from getting in there.

Image from Google
Image from Google

4. Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire

The food is one of the most celebrated things during the festive season. While there is a lot for us to enjoy, and we will be partial to sharing some of our Christmas dinner with our pets, please be aware of some of the foods that are poisonous to them that we eat at this time of year.

Nuts are very toxic to pets, especially macadamia nuts and walnuts, so make sure that any dropped nuts are picked up and none are left on surfaces they can reach easily. Raisins and grapes are also very poisonous and should be kept out of reach as they have been found to cause renal failure in large quantities.

Be sure not to give your pets chicken or turkey bones as these are very easy to swallow and choke on and are also much more prone to splintering than other bones. Please also note that if you decide to give your furry friend some of the Christmas feast that you make sure there are no onions or garlic in the mix as these are also very harmful to pets.

Chocolate and alcohol are also big no’s when it comes to Christmas treats. Chocolate (especially dark) is incredibly poisonous to pets and so should not be consumed by them. However, if you want to give them a chocolate treat there are plenty of pet-friendly chocolates to give your pets that are made from carab.

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5. The Fire is So Delightful

If you have an open fire this Christmas do make sure to have a fire guard up to prevent particularly curious pets from burning themselves on the open flames. After all, there’s nothing a pet loves more than curling up by a warm fire.

6. Presents!(We Love Presents!)

While this list may seem a heavy warning for the festive period, it is important to remember to keep your pet’s safety in mind. Of course, there are plenty of fun things to do with your pet during Christmas, one of which is giving them presents to unwrap! There is nothing that Inky, Finn, and Philomena love more than unwrapping toys and treats on Christmas morning!  It’s great to incorporate your pet in the festive celebrations (and if you’re stuck for ideas then take a look here).

Not only that, but you can always give them their own Christmas dinner – our three love some chicken and Christmas vegetables while we have our festive lunch. It’s a day where everyone gets treated, we just have to make sure we look after our furry friends while we do!

Have a Holly Jolly Christmas!
Have a Holly Jolly Christmas!